A thousand bottles

A breeze blows in the window and across the room where it feels cool on my skin and lifts soft wisps of hair off my face. Outside the trees sway and dance with a million graceful arms that make a sweet rustling sound and provide a background for the instrumental music playing from my computer. A steady, but easy and soundless, rain continues to fall as if it will not stop for days. Arthur sleeps in his safe place behind the recliner I often sit in to read. Earlier on the screened-in porch, Arthur’s shivering and quaking from the cool air or fear of the weather eventually drives us both inside.

It’s a very peaceful moment and would that I could bottle it and hang it from my neck on a thin ribbon to experience when I’m not at peace and life is a clanging symbol fraught with uncertainty and fear and longing. Would that I could breathe in this moment and set my soul to rest at whim.

Would that I could fill a thousand bottles and give one to you.

May a cool breeze tease your hair, softly brush your face, and clear your mind.

Have a nice weekend.

 

 

 

 


Someone left the cake out in the rain

Rain.

Rain.

Rain.

Enough.

Why does it rain? The simple answer.  More.

Songs about rain.

Pictures of rain.


Spock and Alanis Morissette

I was going to finish my photos from Italy today because you’re tired of them, I’m tired of them, and I want to move on to Ireland by St. Patrick’s Day, but I woke up thinking about Japan.

So I’m posting today about two mostly unrelated things, but not really, Japan and Figments of a Dutchess, a blog I’m following.

What a nightmare the people in Japan are living through, and possibly not living through. Having been educated as a chemical engineer in the late 70s, although I don’t have a lot of knowledge about nuclear reactions, I do understand chemical ones and how these things can spiral out of control taking on a life of their own. I’ve listened to the nuclear physicists on CNN explain rod exposure to air, melt-down, by-product fires, and container breach—it’s scary indeed.

The fifty brave and loyal Japanese nuclear plant workers who have stayed behind when it was no longer safe to be there are truly heroes. Their living nightmare must be one of little sleep or food, and great physical effort. They are in a battle zone in a toxic environment. They are the only living human beings at the center of a circle with a 30-kilometer radius. They are like warriors in a sci-fi movie fighting something living and growing that is bigger than themselves. They are like Spock in Star Trek II — The Wrath of Khan when he dies from radiation exposure while living his motto, “The needs of the many outweigh the needs of the few.”

God bless them and God bless their loved ones.

The reason I mention Alanis Morissette is that I regularly follow a blog called Figments of a Dutchess by Marion Driessen who lives in the south of Holland. She’s an avid reader of fantasy, mysteries & thrillers, plays RPGames and is roleplayer in Dungeons & Dragons campaigns, which all brings back warm memories of my son Michael when he lived at home and was interested in the same.  She is a talented writer and writes about all kinds of things, including the culture in Holland which I find fascinating.  Today she posted a link to a song by Alanis Morissette about finding the strength within, that I listened to and was inspired by. I hope you will be too.   Figments of a Dutchess—Alanis Morissette.


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