Taking it to a table — a blogging tip

I’ve been working on my blog’s organization. First it was the drawers in the kitchen, then my clothes closet, and now my blog. I’m in one of those, as my daughter used to say when she was young, “organize it up” moods.

I’ve been working on my menu pages (tabs across the top), in particular on my “Places” page. The drop-down menu was getting too long and bulky so I categorized things into USA cities, International, and added a National Parks page.

My Yellowstone post was the first in what I hope eventually becomes my series of posts about the National Parks we have visited, and will visit in the future.

Do you have any you can recommend?

I’ve been using tables to  keep things organized. So I thought I’d share with you how to do that.

First you have to find and use the “text” tab on the edit post screen at the top of the menu bar. I explain this in n a post last year,  Fun with fonts.

For a table, this is all you need ( I keep it in a word document where I can copy it from and then paste it here. It’s just a lazy woman’s short cut.):

<table border=”1″>
<tbody>
<tr>
<td></td>
<td></td>
</tr>
</tbody>
</table>

Think of it as a symmetrical sandwich. Or paired parentheses. In html when you have a command or instruction, it is typically enclosed in <>. I talked about how to do this with fonts in  Fun with fonts.

Each command needs a closing command. So they come in pairs: an “<em>” will italicize the words that follow it, ad infinitum until you add the closing command “</em>”, which is simply the basic command preceded by a “/”. I explain this idea more thoroughly in Fun with fonts.

If you look at the html for a table, you see the “<table>” command at the top and it’s mate at the bottom “</table>”. (You also see a specification for the table border at the top). Then you have the table body “<tbody>”, the row “<tr>”, and the cell “<td>”. They all have closing commands that are nested together, like parentheses.

Right now I have only one row <tr> in the table. It has two cells <td>. And once I type (or paste) it in the “text” window, it will look like this (without the words):

 First cell in one row Second cell in one row

If I want more cells across the page, I just add “<td> </td>” inbetween the <tr> and </tr> in the code above.

<table border=”1″>
<tbody>
<tr>
<td></td>
<td></td>
<td></td>
<td></td>
</tr>
</tbody>
</table>

cell one cell two cell three cell four

I typed the words that appear in each cell in between the <td> and </td> while I was working in the “text” editing window. But once you have the table set up, you can see the lines for it in your “visual” view. Then you can place your cursor inside a cell and type or place pictures as you please. My only caution about pictures in tables is that if they are too large, they will blow out the table borders and not work. I often use “thumbnail” or resize the photo to be 150, 200, or 250 pixels wide if I want to use one in a table. Read my post about putting pictures on WordPress.

If you want more rows, you add them with the number of cells you are using in between. So for the above table, if I wanted to add a row, I would need to add

<tr>
<td></td>
<td></td>
<td></td>
<td></td>
</tr>

for each row I wanted. This all has to be before the closing </tbody> and </table> commands.

I have some good examples of multi-row, two-cell tables on my Birds and Deer pages under the Wildlife tab above.

I hope you’ll give it a try and let me know how it works. Feel free to send me your questions if you want to do this and get stumped.

Cheers.

   

From Yellowstone post. Click on picture to see larger image.

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19 thoughts on “Taking it to a table — a blogging tip”

    1. also, to purchase your domain, got to your Dashboard, click on “store” and then pick the first box called “Add a Domain” you’ll see the price is a total of $18. Just click and follow the steps.

  1. I’ve been using WordPress since 2006, and I’ve never been able to figure out the table stuff. Thanks.

    I’m curious, though: Did you do those photos in a table? Or did you use the WordPress gallery feature? I’m trying to figure out the gallery, too.

    1. I used tables. I’ve never messed with the gallery. It’s probably simpler, but I bet gives you less control. Mostly I use tables for my landing pages. I’m not sure anybody really looks at those anyway, but it feeds my OCD.

  2. P.S.: Are you looking for recommendations on posts on the National Parks, or on National Parks to visit?

    I don’t think there can be too much good information on any of the 300+ NP units. Denali is always good. Yosemite is the most-posted about, I’ll wager, and most photographed, but it is really that spectacular. Great Smokies is probably the most-overlooked (and also the most-visited in the system). Glacier is stunning in every way. Bryce and Zion are almost never visited more than cursorily. Canyonlands is overlooked because it’s primitive. Great Basin is overlooked because it’s new. National Capital is heavily visited, but most people don’t realize exactly how big it is or how grand.

    And if you limit yourself to the National Parks, commendable as such explication is, you leave out the nation’s largest natural park, Adirondack State Park.

    Good luck!

  3. I’ve only been to a few of the national parks, and some of them when I was a kid. I haven’t been into the southwest at all.

    The last time I’ve been in an American national park was Acadia, which is a gorgeous area.

    1. I was a Chemical Engineer, but most of my limited web and HTML knowledge I taught myself. I’m really a hack, but usually can figure out what I want to do, if I set my standards and aspirations low. 🙂

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